This is simply amazing…

This is simply amazing…

(Source: memewhore, via dudeistlibertarian)

169,647 notes

"English Motherfucker, Do you speak it?!" Gotta love Samuel L Jackson in Pulp Fiction

(Source: abernathyed, via dudeistlibertarian)

773 notes

Settlements of Middle Earth part 1 part 2

(via dudeistlibertarian)

42,449 notes

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Sweet Potato Biscuits
Even five years after the war’s end, southerners continued to suffer shortages of flour, a rare and pricey commodity. Sweet potatoes were a popular means of extending the flour needed to bake.

Yields: about one dozen
1 2/3 cups flour
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2½ teaspoons baking powder
1½ teaspoons salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
¾ cup cooked and pureed sweet potato
¼ cup half and half
vegetable oil cooking spray

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, cut butter into flour mixture until mix resembles coarse crumbs. Add sweet potato and half and half; using a wooden spoon or dough whisk, mix until dough comes together. Turn dough out onto lightly floured work surface and knead gently until dough holds together, about five or six times.
 Roll out dough to a thickness of ½ inch. Using a biscuit cutter dipped in flour between each cut, cut out biscuits and place on a sheet pan sprayed with vegetable oil cooking spray. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes.
http://www.historypressblog.net/2012/03/13/antique-eats-cw-sweet-potato/

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Sweet Potato Biscuits

Even five years after the war’s end, southerners continued to suffer shortages of flour, a rare and pricey commodity. Sweet potatoes were a popular means of extending the flour needed to bake.

Yields: about one dozen

1 2/3 cups flour

1 tablespoon brown sugar

2½ teaspoons baking powder

1½ teaspoons salt

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

¾ cup cooked and pureed sweet potato

¼ cup half and half

vegetable oil cooking spray

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, cut butter into flour mixture until mix resembles coarse crumbs. Add sweet potato and half and half; using a wooden spoon or dough whisk, mix until dough comes together. Turn dough out onto lightly floured work surface and knead gently until dough holds together, about five or six times.

 Roll out dough to a thickness of ½ inch. Using a biscuit cutter dipped in flour between each cut, cut out biscuits and place on a sheet pan sprayed with vegetable oil cooking spray. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes.

http://www.historypressblog.net/2012/03/13/antique-eats-cw-sweet-potato/

132 notes

thecivilwarparlor:

Lincoln In Art~
This portrait is comprised of the words from one of Abraham Lincoln’s famous quotes:  
“In the end it’s  not the years in your life that counts, it’s the life in your years.”
Abe Lincoln/ Black and White by SiggieDude
Digital Art / Typography / Text-based Imagery
http://siggiedude.deviantart.com/art/Abe-Lincoln-Black-and-White-292435397 Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a 
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

This is really really cool

thecivilwarparlor:

Lincoln In Art~

This portrait is comprised of the words from one of Abraham Lincoln’s famous quotes: 

“In the end it’s  not the years in your life that counts, it’s the life in your years.”

Abe Lincoln/ Black and White by SiggieDude

http://siggiedude.deviantart.com/art/Abe-Lincoln-Black-and-White-292435397 Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a 

This is really really cool

70 notes

Michael Rizzi, will you be baptized?
I will.

(Source: newfluffytown, via dudeistlibertarian)

1,987 notes

dudeistlibertarian:

thecakebar:

Apple Pie Fries Tutorial {click link for FULL recipe & tutorial}

Must we play God?

172,531 notes

"A human life, I think, should be well rooted in some spot of native land, where it may get the love of tender kinship for the face of earth, for the labours men go forth to, for the sounds and accents that haunt it, for whatever will give that early home a familiar unmistakeable difference amidst the future widening of knowledge: a spot where the definiteness of early memories may be inwrought with affection, and kindly acquaintance with all neighbours, even to the dogs and donkeys, may spread not by sentimental effort and reflection, but as a sweet habbit of the blood. At five years old, mortals are not prepared to be citizens of the world, to be stimulated by abstract nouns, to soar above preference into impartiality; and that prejudice in favour of milk with which we blindly begin, is a type of the way body and soul must get nourished at least for a time. The best introduction to astronomy is to think of the nightly heavens as a little lot of stars belonging to one’s own homestead."

George Eliot

0 notes

boromirs:

A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!

(via dudeistlibertarian)

8,650 notes

thecivilwarparlor:

Compromise With The South
This image was created by Thomas Nast in the fall of 1864. It was created at a time when Lincoln was up for re-election and there was a definite possibility that he would loose, as many Americans were tired of war and wanted a peaceful resolution with the Confederacy. It is a direct attack on the Democrats’ Chicago Convention, which called for a party platform of peace with the Confederates, which Nast saw as a total waste of those Union soldiers that have already died in the fight.
An Iconic reading of this image would deal with the values of the community that are reflected in the image. This image is clearly propagandist, pushing viewers to question what would happen if victory was given to the Confederacy. The disabled soldier extends his hand to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, who is also standing on the grave of a dead Union soldier in an obvious sign of disrespect. Columbia is kneeling crying before that very grave and there are blacks, assumed to be slaves or former slaves in the background, huddled, not sure what is their future. All of these images are inflammatory, and force readers to think of the negative consequences of a Confederate victory. By dedicating the image to the Chicago Convention, the artist is reminding people that if they vote for the Democrats that this would be the future of the United States, thereby, strongly encouraging them to vote for Lincoln and the Republicans. This particular image’s Iconic reading would also be close to an Editorial reading. The symbolism in the image makes it hard not see that there is a clear political purpose to the image. The author clearly supports Lincoln and not making peace with the Confederacy.
http://teachingdigitalhistory.ning.com/forum/topics/reading-the-illustrated

thecivilwarparlor:

Compromise With The South

This image was created by Thomas Nast in the fall of 1864. It was created at a time when Lincoln was up for re-election and there was a definite possibility that he would loose, as many Americans were tired of war and wanted a peaceful resolution with the Confederacy. It is a direct attack on the Democrats’ Chicago Convention, which called for a party platform of peace with the Confederates, which Nast saw as a total waste of those Union soldiers that have already died in the fight.

An Iconic reading of this image would deal with the values of the community that are reflected in the image. This image is clearly propagandist, pushing viewers to question what would happen if victory was given to the Confederacy. The disabled soldier extends his hand to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, who is also standing on the grave of a dead Union soldier in an obvious sign of disrespect. Columbia is kneeling crying before that very grave and there are blacks, assumed to be slaves or former slaves in the background, huddled, not sure what is their future. All of these images are inflammatory, and force readers to think of the negative consequences of a Confederate victory. By dedicating the image to the Chicago Convention, the artist is reminding people that if they vote for the Democrats that this would be the future of the United States, thereby, strongly encouraging them to vote for Lincoln and the Republicans. This particular image’s Iconic reading would also be close to an Editorial reading. The symbolism in the image makes it hard not see that there is a clear political purpose to the image. The author clearly supports Lincoln and not making peace with the Confederacy.

http://teachingdigitalhistory.ning.com/forum/topics/reading-the-illustrated

34 notes